Coronavirus Advice

The following message is for apprentices who may have concerns about the Novel Coronavirus (also known as COVID-19).

Latest information (updated Wednesday 25 March 2020 at 18.30)

  • The University of Sheffield AMRC Training Centre remains open, but we have no alternative option, given the current circumstances, but to temporarily suspend face-to-face teaching from Monday 16 March. This means that students should not attend the AMRC Training Centre from Monday 16th March until further notice.
     
  • The Prime Minister has announced that people must stay at home and should only leave their home for one of four reasons: shopping for basic necessities, including food and medicine, which must be as infrequent as possible; one form of exercise a day - alone or with members of your household; any medical need or to provide care for a vulnerable person; and travelling to and from essential work, but only where this absolutely cannot be done from home. It is absolutely imperative that staff and students adhere to this.

The AMRC Training Centre is part of the University of Sheffield and we are treating this as a major incident.  Our top priority is always the health and safety of students, staff and those who make up our wider community across the globe.

We will continue to issue any further advice and guidance as it becomes available, so we encourage everyone to read the information contained within these FAQs carefully and regularly, and to follow the instructions given.


Frequently asked questions

Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses common around the world,which may cause illness in animals or humans. The Novel Coronavirus (or COVID-19) originated in Wuhan City, Hubei Province, China in December 2019, but cases have since been confirmed in other parts of China and in countries around the world.

Public Health England has assessed the current risk to the public as ‘low to moderate’ and will be working with the World Health Organisation (WHO), the NHS and other international partners constantly to review the situation.

Typical symptoms of coronavirus include fever and respiratory symptoms, including coughing, sneezing, and shortness of breath. The current evidence is that most cases appear to be mild, although symptoms can progress to severe pneumonia causing shortness of breath and breathing difficulties.

Coronavirus can cause more severe symptoms in people with weakened immune systems, older people, and those with long term conditions like diabetes, cancer and chronic lung disease.

The World Health Organisation suggests good practice to avoid the spread of infection includes:

  • Washing your hands more regularly than normal and thoroughly using soap and water for 20 seconds, or twice the amount of time it takes to sing ‘Happy Birthday’.
  • Or if hand-washing facilities are currently unavailable, using hand sanitiser until you can wash your hands again.
  • Covering your mouth and nose when you sneeze or cough and where possible with a tissue or your sleeve. Remember to wash your hands as soon as possible afterwards. Dispose of the tissue immediately.
  • Avoiding sharing food, drink and utensils.
  • Thoroughly cooking meat and eggs and avoiding raw or undercooked animal products.
  • Regularly cleaning surfaces with disinfectant, such as desks, phones (including your mobile phone), keyboards and mice.
  • Avoiding close contact with anyone with cold or flu-like symptoms.

If you have either a high temperature or a new continuous cough you should stay at home for seven days from when your symptoms started. You do not need to call NHS 111 to go into self isolation. If your symptoms worsen during home isolation or are no better within seven days contact NHS111 online. If you have no internet access, you should call NHS 111. For a medical emergency call 999.


Read government advice 'Stay at home: guidance for people with confirmed or possible coronavirus (COVID-19) infection'


If you need to self-isolate you should inform your academic department, your landlord or residential provider and notify support@sheffield.ac.uk, who will be able to signpost you to the support available to you.

If you have either a high temperature or a new continuous cough you should stay at home for seven days from when your symptoms started. You do not need to call NHS 111 to go into self isolation. If your symptoms worsen during home isolation or are no better within seven days contact NHS111 online. If you have no internet access, you should call NHS 111. For a medical emergency call 999.

Read government advice 'Stay at home: guidance for people with confirmed or possible coronavirus (COVID-19) infection'

If you need to self-isolate you should inform your academic department, your landlord or residential provider and notify support@sheffield.ac.uk, who will be able to signpost you to the support available to you.

Detailed advice on self-isolation from Public Health England, along with advice for people living with someone who is self-isolating, is available on the government website. It is imperative that you follow these guidelines. This means remaining in your accommodation, not attending exams or lectures and limiting your contact with others.

How do I self-isolate or keep myself well whilst living with someone self-isolating?

The advice and guidance on this updated page is addressed to the person self-isolating, but all the information needed by house- and flatmates to help them during this time is included within the text.


Contact Us


Leave us with some details and we will provide you with more information.